Workplace of the artist
For the artist, it’s not only the muse that is important, but ordinary everyday (workers) so that the conditions of visual perception do not hamper the artist’s imagination, the room…

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William Morris - First Designer
The profession of designer today is popular and in demand. Specialists in this field make sure that our phones, cars, furniture and household items are not only functional, but also…

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8 important principles of oil painting
Oil paints are responsive and versatile. But mastering is not as difficult as it might seem at first. The correct use of the color and texture of the oil allows…

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How to draw falling snow in watercolor or ink

To paint snow, and even watercolor, is often a difficult task for beginners. But we will help! We reveal some secrets.

5 tips from successful illustrators
Masking fluid.
This fluid will help you recreate a natural, voluminous winter sky. A masking liquid is a viscous, translucent substance with which you can close certain parts of the picture – those that you do not want to paint over at the moment. When applied, it is moist, and when dried, acquires a slightly sticky consistency. “Masked” areas will not be affected by the paint, even if you paint over a layer of masking material.

The use of this substance not only helps to get rid of dirt at work, but also magically eliminates the need to write snow: just peel off the glued one, and voila! – snow will appear in your picture.

We illustrate this with an example. Suppose you have ink and you want to draw a picture with falling snow. How to do it?

First method: you can simply draw dots on the sheet that simulate falling snowflakes. The advantages of this method are its simplicity and brush control. The disadvantage is that the look will be quite decorative, and not every job will do.

The second method, “tapping”: dip a brush in a masking liquid, place it over the sheet and, leading your hand, gently tap the droplets of liquid onto the canvas with a gentle tapping. Here control is already a little less, but the appearance of “snowflakes” will be more natural.

Third method, with a toothbrush: take an old toothbrush and dip it in masking liquid. Now with your finger gently pull and release the villi over the sheet, as a result of which liquid will splash onto it. This control method has the least and greatest risk of overdoing and messing up, but the result is completely unique and natural.

Result
After choosing the appropriate method, apply masking liquid with it, and then proceed to work. It doesn’t matter what you do: watercolor or ink. At the end of the work, dry it, and then simply remove the pieces of masking. So the snow has begun!

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The painting “Christina's World” became the quintessential success and glory of Andrew Wyeth, and turned into a real American “icon”, along with “American Gothic” by Wood, Whistler's “Portrait of Mother”…

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Grisaille art technique in the history of world art
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