Andrew World Part 1
Andrew Wyeth is simultaneously one of the most popular and most attacked artists in American art. Because of his retreat, he was like a thorn in the eye of a…

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Sanguine, sauce, charcoal: soft materials in a graphic pattern.
Graphic drawing is associated primarily with detailed pencil sketches and portraits, clear ink illustrations and capillary pens. Soft, bulk materials often remain forgotten at the end of the basics of…

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How to realistically convey skin tone with oil.
How to realistically convey skin tone with oil. Oil is one of the classic art materials for portraiture. Nevertheless, it is the reproduction of the shades of human skin that…

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How to realistically convey skin tone with oil.

How to realistically convey skin tone with oil.
Oil is one of the classic art materials for portraiture. Nevertheless, it is the reproduction of the shades of human skin that represents the greatest difficulty for aspiring artists. Today we will talk about how to achieve realism in the image of the skin, without going into stylization and various impressionist techniques.
Color mixing.
When working with oil, special attention must be paid to the bright segments of the portrait.
It is recommended to put the light tone first: the effect of photorealism is achieved by playing in contrast, and the accuracy of the contrast is much easier to choose relative to the light spot. In addition, lightening a plot is always more difficult than darkening. By making the foundation light, you create a luminous space that is easy to work with; on which errors are not hidden in the shadows, but immediately noticeable.

For a light skin tone, you will need the following paints:

Red;
White;
Blue;
Yellow.
Mix them in different proportions, achieving maximum uniformity of tone. To make the overall color colder (for example, for the skin at the temples, wrists, etc.) add a little blue to the palette and mix thoroughly with the primary color sample. For blush, lit areas, add yellow and red.
Please note: when mixed, the oil gives a darker color than the original paints. To achieve a naturalistic shade, mix the whitewash to a satisfactory result.

Darker skin tones are achieved by adding purple, sienna, and burnt umber to the mix. The skin can change the visual tint due to the time of day, lighting, surroundings, etc., so experiment with the proportions until you achieve the most accurate reproduction of the skin tone of the model.

Overlay paint
Human skin is one of the most smooth and soft materials displayed in the painting. To achieve realism, it is necessary to pay special attention to the smoothness of the portrait part of the picture, soft color transitions. There are several principles that allow you to achieve a “glow effect” that gives the skin a realistic shine:
Mixing colors only on the palette. Oil expression is expressed in volumetric, visually distinguishable strokes, passing from one tone to another. But in realistic portraits, such a technique is fatal: it ages the face, adds unnecessary details to it. Check the colors on the palette to avoid color mixing and multiple overlays on the canvas. The fewer corrections, the less the tone deviates from the intended.

The use of solvent. A small amount of solvent can help level the border between color levels. This will create a smooth, smooth transition, similar to real bends of the skin. Scoop a small amount of solvent with a corner of the single brush, then gently brush the border between the colors with a gentle brushstroke. If you use layering, do not forget to achieve greater transparency from each layer before adding the following: this creates the effect of life, makes the portrait acquire realistic brilliance and natural complexity.
The strength of the oil is the ability to accurately reproduce any shade. Use this feature to recreate not only the basic skin tone of the model, but also the shade on the folds of the palms (it is repeated on the temples and around the eyelids), on the neck (if the neck is in the shade, it is repeated on other shadow areas). It is the tonal relationships and texture that add realism to oil portraits. Pay attention to details – and you will understand that a beautiful, recognizable portrait oil painting is available to every hardworking artist.

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